First question: What natural occurrence kills more people in the United States than any other calamity combined?

Answer: summer heat waves.

The best way to protect yourself from heatstroke is to avoid dehydration. Even then, one out of 10 persons will die if they have a heatstroke.

The best method to avoid heatstroke is to not get too hot. In general, it’s straightforward. Keep an eye on the weather and remain in the air-conditioning on those scorching days.

But what if you’re in a bind and need to get out quickly? What happens if the air conditioner goes down or isn’t there? Perhaps you’ll have to run, carry a backpack, or chop down trees. Do you know how to avoid heatstroke in any situation?

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One of the most disturbing elements about heatstroke is that it is typically preventable. So, whether you enjoy this quiz or not, why not ask your friends to beat your score (and educate them in the process)?

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  • How did you do on the test? Did you learn anything? Do you have other tips to share?
  1. Correct
  2. True. Sweating is a critical method for the body to cool down. Sweating is one way your body adapts to heat over time by increasing sweating in proportion to the amount of heat.
  3. Incorrect
  4. True. Sweating is just one of the many techniques your body uses to cool down. Sweating, in fact, increases as the amount of heat builds up over time.
  5. Correct
  6. True. Sweating is less effective when the air is more humid. Sweating is hindered by humidity. Evaporation, in turn, helps to keep us cool.
  7. Incorrect
  8. True. Sweating is difficult when the air is more humid. Sweating becomes more difficult as a result of this evaporation. This evaporation helps to keep us cool.
  9. Correct
  10. False. To compensate for sweat loss, drink a couple of glasses of water every hour. It’s usually best to drink them cold, but ice-cold fluids can induce stomach cramps in some individuals.
  11. Incorrect
  12. False. To make up for sweat loss, drink at least a couple of glasses of fluids each hour. It’s usually preferable to drink them cold, but ice-cold drinks might induce stomach cramps in certain people.
  13. Correct
  14. False. That’s too much sodium. In fact most people can get more than enough salt in their normal solid foods. If you’re really sweating a lot, consider adding about ¼ teaspoon of table salt to every other quart of water. And maybe add ¼ teaspoon of one of those potassium salt substitutes. Or, instead of all that, drink a sports drink or Pedialyte. Of course, before you add the salt and potassium, have a prior talk with your doctor if you have any potential medical issues with your heart or kidneys.
  15. Incorrect
  16. False. That’s too much sodium. In fact most people can get more than enough salt in their normal solid foods. If you’re really sweating a lot, consider adding about ¼ teaspoon of table salt to every other quart of water. And maybe add ¼ teaspoon of one of those potassium salt substitutes. Or, instead of all that, drink a sports drink or Pedialyte. Of course, before you add the salt and potassium, have a prior talk with your doctor if you have any potential medical issues with your heart or kidneys.
  17. Correct
  18. True. If you wait to drink, your body’s functions will not operate as effectively since they will be in dehydration mode.
  19. Incorrect
  20. True. If you put off drinking, your bodily processes will operate less efficiently since they will be in dehydrated mode.
  21. Correct
  22. True. People who work outside on a daily basis, and over time get used to the heat, are an example. However, when the temperature suddenly rises and the body hasn’t had time to acclimate, everyone is vulnerable to heat waves, even them. (Acclimation generally takes weeks.)
  23. Incorrect
  24. True. One example is those who work outside frequently and become accustomed to the heat. Everyone, including them, is vulnerable to heat waves when the temperature suddenly rises and the body hasn’t had time to adjust. (It usually takes weeks for acclimation.)
  25. Correct
  26. False. Fans aren’t typically used to keep cool in hot weather. They may appear to make you feel cooler, but when the temperatures rise, so does your true level of comfort. Fans lose their ability to cool your core body heat as the temperature rises from 90 degrees Fahrenheit to around 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Some might benefit from spraying themselves down with cold water or placing the fan so its air blows over some ice.
  27. Incorrect
  28. False. Fans may make you feel cooler, but when temperatures rise, the sensation of false security sets in. Fans can’t cool your core body heat any longer, which has been increasing day by day since mid-nineties. Spraying yourself down with cold water or placing the fan so its air blows over some ice might help to a certain extent.
  29. Correct
  30. True. Take a quick swim to cool down. Some people believe that this raises the risk of catching a cold, but this is untrue. Viruses cause colds. Furthermore, respiratory infections aren’t nearly as dangerous as heat strokes.
  31. Incorrect
  32. True. Heatstroke can happen in a matter of minutes. As quickly as possible, hydrate yourself. Some individuals say that this raises your chance of getting a cold, but it isn’t true. Viruses are the source of colds. Furthermore, a cold is not nearly as dangerous as heatstroke.
  33. Correct
  34. True. It tends to be cooler at those times.
  35. Incorrect
  36. True. It tends to be cooler at those times.
  37. Correct
  38. True. Read this post for some of them.
  39. Heat-related illness is a spectrum of disorders. Heat exhaustion has signs and symptoms, which should scream, “Warning, warning!” You’re heading for the cliff if you don’t listen to them.
  40. However, because the elderly and younger individuals may have fewer warning indicators, I believe that there are “nearly always” warning signals. Their symptoms and indications can be less obvious. Furthermore, they don’t or can’t pay attention to them, so they take action rarely or not at all.
  41. We might all benefit from this knowledge: One danger signal is confusion. You may not realize you’re becoming too hot if you’re unsure. It’s preferable to have a companion present so both of you can keep an eye on each other.
  42. Incorrect
  43. True. Read this post for some of them.
  44. Heat-related illness is a range of disorders. The initial stage is heat exhaustion, which alerts you to the presence of danger. You’re heading for the cliff if you don’t listen to them.
  45. However, because the elderly and infants can have fewer warning signals, I would say that “nearly always” there are warning indications. The indicators and symptoms they do have may be more subtle. Furthermore, many times they don’t or aren’t able to listen to them, resulting in them taking action.
  46. And a caution to us all: confusion may be one of the warning signs. If you’re perplexed, you might not realize you’re becoming too hot. It’s nice to have a partner around so that you can keep an eye on each other.

Photo credit: madartzgraphics

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